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Evidence papers for EIBI

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Evidence Papers for Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention (EIBI) 


 

Early Intensive Applied Behavior Analytic Intervention for Autism: Selected Resources

Gina Green, PhD, BCBA (ggreen3@cox.net)

10/16/08

 

Statement on Evidence Base for ABA Interventions with links to cited articles.

Adapted from "Applied Behavior Analysis and Neurodevelopmental Disorders: Overview and Summary of Scientific Support"

Authors: Louis P. Hagopian & Eric W. Boelter

The Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

 

News/New papers


Intensive teaching results in dramatic improvements

Thursday April 26, 2007

The Guardian

 

A two-year British study into the impact of early intensive behavioural intervention (EIBI) found that some toddlers on the programme jumped 40 IQ points. A quarter showed "very substantial improvements", and none regressed.

 

The youngsters also showed more advanced language and better daily living skills than similar children in a control group who received standard educational support such as speech therapy.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,,2065476,00.html

 

 

 

The full study on which this research report is based is:

Remington, B., Hastings, R. P., Kovshoff, K. et al. A field effectiveness study of early intensive behavioural intervention: outcomes for children with autism and their parents after two years. American Journal on Mental Retardation. (In press).


Eikeseth, S., Smith, T., Jahr, E., & Eldevik, S. (2007)

Outcome for children with autism who began intensive behavioral treatment between ages 4 and 7.

Behavior Modification, Vol. 31, No. 3, 264-278

DOI: 10.1177/0145445506291396

FULL TEXT

 

This study extends findings on the effects of intensive applied behavior analytic treatment for children with autism who began treatment at a mean age of 5.5 years. The behavioral treatment group (n = 13, 8 boys) was compared to an eclectic treatment group (n = 12, 11 boys). Assignment to groups was made independently based on the availability of qualified supervisors. Both behavioral and eclectic treatment took place in public kindergartens and elementary schools for typically developing children. At a mean age of 8 years, 2 months, the behavioral treatment group showed larger increases in IQ and adaptive functioning than did the eclectic group. The behavioral treatment group also displayed fewer aberrant behaviors and social problems at follow-up. Results suggest that behavioral treatment was effective for children with autism in the study.

 

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"Ourcomes in the Ontario IBI Program"; Perry, Cummings, Geier, Hughes, Freeman,

LaRose, Managhan, Reitzel, and Williams, presented at the ONTABA Conference on

November 10, 2006.

Plain language description

 

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Comparison Table of Intervention studies

 

AUTISM AND APPLIED BEHAVIOUR ANALYSIS (LOVAAS): AN UPDATE

Comment on the analysis of some of the below studies

MJ Connor, Feb.2006


Key: n=number; CA=chronological age at intake; IQ=IQ (see specific citation for testing instrument);

dur=duration of treatment; lang-rec=receptive language; lang-exp=expressive language;

Adaptive=composite score Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales; #normal IQ=# participants who moved from

delay to normal range on IQ test over the course of cited study.

Int.=Intensive. Ec=eclectic; SPED=typical special education; ParentABA=parent directed ABA (consultancy model);

Int.Ec.=Intensive Eclectic, Non-Int.=Non intensive.


Author(s), (year) N CA IQ hrs/wk dur Measures ABA CompGp1   CompGr2  
                       
Lovaas (1987) n=19 35m 63 40 24+m   ABA 10ABA+SPED n=19 SPED n=21
            IQ +20 0   0  
Therapist           #Normal IQ 9/19 0/19   1/21  
availability                      
matched                      
Sallows & Graupner(2005) n=13 35m 51 38 24+m   ABA ParentInt.ABA n=10    
            IQ +22.2 +27.5      
Randomized           Nonverbal +7.0 +6.7      
            Lang-Rec +17.0 +27.0      
            Lang-Exp +5.5 +10.8      
            Adaptive +9.5 +5.8      
            # normalIQ 5/13 6/10        
Author(s), (year) N CA IQ hrs/wk dur Measures ABA CompGp1   CompGp2  
                       
Cohen, Amerine-Dickens&Smith(2006) n=21 30m 62 35-40 36+m   ABA SPED n=21    
            IQ +25 +14      
IEP/IFSP team           Nonverbal +13 +13      
matched           Lang-rec +20 +9      
            Lang-exp +25 +15      
            Adaptive +9 -4      
            #normal IQ 12/21 7/21      
Smith, Groen, &Wynne (2000) n=15 24m 51 25 33m   ABA ParentABA+SPED n=13    
            IQ +16.0 -1.0      
Randomized           Nonverbal +42.7 +27.3      
matched           Lang-Rec +29.4 +19.9      
            Lang-Exp +22.6 -2.3      
            Adaptive -2.3 -6.7      
            # normalIQ 4/15 0/13      
Author(s), (year) N CA IQ hrs/wk dur Measures ABA CompGp1   CompGp2  
                       
Howard, Sparkman, Cohen, Green,& Stanislaw(2005) n=29 31m 59 25-40 14m   ABA Int.Ec. n=16 NonInt.Ec. n=16
            IQ +29.7 +8.4   +8.9  
IEP/IFSP teams           Nonverbal +20.6 +6.1   +2.3  
matched           Lang-rec +20.2 +3.9   -4.8  
            Lang-exp +20.1 +3.8   -4.5  
            Adaptive +10.5 -0.6   -2.8  
            #normal IQ 13/29 2/16   3/16  
Eldevik, Eikeseth,Jahr, & Smith (2002) n=13 66m 62 28 12m   ABA Int.Ec. n=12    
Therapist           IQ +17.2 +4.3      
ability           Nonverbal +17.5 +8.3      
matched           Lang-Rec +12.7 -0.7      
            Lang-Exp +22.6 -2.3      
            Adaptive +15.7 -1.6      
            # normal IQ 7/13 2/12      
Author(s), (year) N CA IQ hrs/wk dur Measures ABA CompGp1   CompGp2  
                           
Birnbrauer & Leach (1993) n=9 39m 51 19 24m     SPED n=5    
            IQ +7 NT      
            Nonverbal +29 NT      
            Lang +6 -8      
            Adaptive -5 -7      
            #normal IQ 2/9 1/5      
Eldevik, Eikeseth,Jahr, & Smith (2006) n=13 53m 41 12.5 20m   ABA Ec. 1:1 n=15    
            IQ +8.2 -2.9      
            Nonverbal +8.6 -10.5      
            Lang-Rec +6.8 -7.7      
            Lang-Exp +11.0 -6.4      
            Adaptive -0.2 -4.8      
            # normal IQ 1/13 0/15      

 


Key: n=number; CA=chronological age at intake; IQ=IQ (see specific citation for testing instrument);

dur=duration of treatment; lang-rec=receptive language; lang-exp=expressive language;

Adaptive=composite score Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales; #normal IQ=# participants who moved from

delay to normal range on IQ test over the course of cited study.

Int.=Intensive. Ec=eclectic; SPED=typical special education; ParentABA=parent directed ABA (consultancy model);

Int.Ec.=Intensive Eclectic, Non-Int.=Non intensive.


Table adapted from Green, G. (2007).Applied Behavior Analysis in the Treatment of Autism

Autism Services and Support Conference

Camp Pendleton, CA

January 18,2007

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References:

 

Birnbrauer, J.S., & Leach, D.J. (1993). The Murdoch Early Intervention Program After 2

Years. Behaviour Change, 10(2): 63-74.

 

Cohen, H., Amerine-Dickens, Smith, T. (2006).

Early Intensive Behavioral Treatment: Replication of the UCLA Model in a Community Setting

J Dev Behav Pediatr 27:145Y155, 2006.

FULL TEXT

 

Eikeseth, S., Smith, S., Jahr, E., Eldevik, S. (2002).

Intensive Behavioral Treatment at School for 4- to 7-Year-Old Children With Autism A 1-Year Comparison Controlled Study

Behavior Modification, Vol. 26 No. 1, 49-68

FULL TEXT

 

Eldevik, Eikeseth,Jahr, & Smith (2006)

Effects of Low-Intensity Behavioral Treatment for Children with Autism and Mental Retardation.

J.Autism Dev. Discord.36(2)"211-24

 

Howard, J.S., Sparkman, C.R., Cohen, H.G., Green, G., Stanislaw, H. (2005).

A comparison of intensive behavior analytic and eclectic treatments for young children with autism.

Research in Developmental Disabilities 26 (2005) 359–383

doi:10.1016/j.ridd.2004.09.005

FULL TEXT

Followup commentary on Howard, et. al.

 

Lovaas, O. I. (1987).

Behavioral treatment and normal educational and intellectual functioning in young autistic children.

Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 55, 3-9.

 

Sallows, G.O., Graupner, T.D. (2005).

Intensive Behavioral Treatment for Children With Autism: Four-Year Outcome and Predictors.

American Journal on Mental Retardations. Vol 110, No. 6: 417-438

FULL TEXT

 

 

Smith, T., Groen, A.D., & Wynne, J.W. (2000).

Randomized trial of intensive early intervention for children with pervasive developmental disorder. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 105(4), 269-285.

 

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================================================================

Other EIBI, ABA in autism treatment papers

Anderson, S. R. et al. (1987). Intensive home-based early intervention with autistic children. Education and Treatment of Children, 10, 352-366.

 

Bibby, P. et al. (2001). Progress and outcomes for children with autism receiving parent-managed intensive interventions. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 22, 425-447. Read Abstract

 

Birnbrauer, J. S., & Leach, D. J. (1993). The Murdoch Early Intervention Program after 2 years. Behaviour Change, 10, 63-74.

 

Boyd RD and Corley M.J. (2001). Outcome survey of early intensive behavioral intervention for young children with autism in a community setting. Autism, 5(4), pp. 430-441. Read Abstract

 

Butter, E.M., Mulick, J.A. and Metz, B. (2006).

Eight case reports of learning recovery in children with pervasive developmental disorders after early intervention. Behavioral Interventions, 21, 227–243

DOI: 10.1002/bin.225

Thanks to COFEAT

 

Cohen H., Amerine -Dickens M. & Smith T (2006) Cohen, H., Amerine-Dickens, Smith, T. (2006).

Early Intensive Behavioral Treatment: Replication of the UCLA Model in a Community Setting. Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics. 27, 145-155.

 

Eikeseth, S. et al. (2002). Intensive behavioral treatment at school for 4-7-year-old children with autism: A 1-year comparison controlled study. Behavior Modification, 2002, 49-68. Read Abstract

 

Eikeseth, S., Smith, T., Jahr, E., & Eldevik, S. (2007).

Outcome for children with autism who began intensive behavioral treatment between ages 4 and 7.

Behavior Modification, Vol. 31, No. 3, 264-278

 

Eldevik, S. et al. (2006) Effects of low intensity behavioural treatment for children with autism and mental retardation, J Autism & Developmental Disorders 36, 211-224. Read Abstract

 

Harris SL, Handleman JS. (2000). Age and IQ at intake as predictors of placement for young children with autism: a four- to six-year follow-up. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 30, 137-142. Read Abstract

 

Howard et al. (2005). A comparison of intensive behavior analytic and eclectic treatments for young children with autism.

Research in Developmental Disabilities 26 (2005) 359–383

doi:10.1016/j.ridd.2004.09.005

FULL TEXT

Followup commentary on Howard, et. al.

 

Lovaas, O. I. (1987). Behavioral treatment and normal educational and intellectual functioning in young autistic children. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 55, 3-9.

 

Lovaas, O. I. & Smith, T. (1989).A comprehensive behavioral theory of autistic children: Paradigm for research and treatment. Journal of Behavioral Therapy and Experimental

Psychiatry, 20, 17-29.

 

Luiselli J., Cannon B., and Sisson R. (2000). Home-based behavioural intervention for young children with autism/pervasive developmental disorder. Autism, 4, 426-438. Read Abstract

 

McEachin, J. J., Smith, T., & Lovaas, O. I. (1993). Long-term outcome for children with autism who received early intensive behavioral treatment. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 97, 359-372. Read Abstract (This is a follow up study of the original group studied by Lovaas.)

 

Magiati, I, Charman T. & Howlin P. (2007). A two-year prospective follow-up study of community-based early intensive behavioural intervention and specialist nursery provision for children with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 48(8), pp. 803-812. Read Abstract.

 

Matson, J. L., Benavidez, D.A., Compton, L.S., Paclawskyj, T., & Baglio, C. (1996).

Behavioral treatment of autistic persons: A review of research from 1980 to the present.

Research in Developmental Disabilities, 17, 433-465.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0891-4222(96)00030-3

 

Mudford, O., Martin, N., Eikeseth, S., Bibby, P. (2001) Parent-managed behavioral treatment for pre-school children with autism: some characteristics of UK programs. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 22, 173-182. Read Abstract

 

Mulick JA, Butter EM. (1997).

Educational advocacy for children with autism.

Behavioral Interventions. 2002;17:54-74.

 

Perry, A., Prichard, E.A., & Penn, H.E. (2006).

Indicators of quality teaching in Intensive Behavioral Intervention: A survey of parents and professionals.

Behavioral Interventions, 21, 85-96.

 

Remington B. et al. (2007). Early intensive behavioral intervention: outcomes for children with autism and their parents after two years. American Journal of Mental Retardation, 112, 418-438.

Overview from Research Autism

Intensive teaching results in dramatic improvements

Thursday April 26, 2007

The Guardian

A two-year British study into the impact of early intensive behavioural intervention (EIBI) found that some toddlers on the programme jumped 40 IQ points. A quarter showed "very substantial improvements", and none regressed.

The youngsters also showed more advanced language and better daily living skills than similar children in a control group who received standard educational support such as speech therapy.

 

Sallows G. O. Graupner T. D. (2005). Intensive behavioral treatment for children with autism: four-year outcome and predictors. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 110, 417-438.

 

Sheinkopf, S.J., & Siegel B. (1999). Home-Based Behavioural Treatment of Young Children with Autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 28, 15 -23. Read Abstract

 

Smith, T., Groen, A. D., & Wynne, J. W. (2000). Randomized trial of intensive early intervention for children with pervasive developmental disorder. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 105 (4), 269-285. Read Abstract

 

Smith T., Buch G.A., Gamby T.E. (2000). Parent-directed, intensive early intervention for children with pervasive developmental disorder. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 21, 297-309. Read Abstract

 

Smith T et al. (1997). Intensive behavioral treatment for preschoolers with severe mental retardation and pervasive developmental disorder. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 102, 238-249. Read Abstract

 

Weiss, M.J. (1999). Differential rates of skill acquisition and outcomes of early intensive behavioral intervention for autism. Behavioral Interventions, 14(1), pp. 3 – 22. Read Abstract

 

Zachor, D.A. et al. (2007). Change in autism core symptoms with intervention. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 1, 304-317.


 

Butter, E.M., Mulick, J.A. and Metz, B. (2006).

Eight case reports of learning recovery in children with pervasive developmental disorders after early intervention

Behav. Intervent. 21: 227–243

DOI: 10.1002/bin.225

FULL TEXT

Thanks to COFEAT

 

Eikeseth, S., Smith, T., Jahr, E., & Eldevik, S. (2007)

Outcome for Children with Autism who Began Intensive Behavioral Treatment Between Ages 4 and 7.

Behavior Modification, Vol. 31, No. 3, 264-278

DOI: 10.1177/0145445506291396

FULL TEXT

 

This study extends findings on the effects of intensive applied behavior analytic treatment for children with autism who began treatment at a mean age of 5.5 years. The behavioral treatment group (n = 13, 8 boys) was compared to an eclectic treatment group (n = 12, 11 boys). Assignment to groups was made independently based on the availability of qualified supervisors. Both behavioral and eclectic treatment took place in public kindergartens and elementary schools for typically developing children. At a mean age of 8 years, 2 months, the behavioral treatment group showed larger increases in IQ and adaptive functioning than did the eclectic group. The behavioral treatment group also displayed fewer aberrant behaviors and social problems at follow-up. Results suggest that behavioral treatment was effective for children with autism in the study.

 

 

Lovaas, O. I. & Smith, T. (1989). A comprehensive behavioral

theory of autistic children: Paradigm for research and

treatment. Journal of Behavioral Therapy and Experimental

Psychiatry, 20, 17-29.

 

Matson, J. L., Benavidez, D.A., Compton, L.S., Paclawskyj, T., & Baglio, C. (1996).

Behavioral treatment of autistic persons: A review of research from 1980 to the present.

Research in Developmental Disabilities, 17, 433-465.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0891-4222(96)00030-3

 

McEachin, J. J., Smith, T., & Lovaas, O. I. (1993).

Long-term outcome for children with autism who received early intensive

behavioral treatment.

American Journal on Mental Retardation,

97 (4), 359-372. (See also the commentaries on this study)

 

Mulick JA, Butter EM. (1997).

Educational advocacy for children with autism.

Behavioral Interventions. 2002;17:54-74.

 

Perry, A., Prichard, E.A., & Penn, H.E. (2006).

Indicators of quality teaching in Intensive Behavioral Intervention: A survey of parents and professionals.

Behavioral Interventions, 21, 85-96.

 

Smith T, Eikeseth S, Klevstrand M, Lovaas OI. (1997).

Intensive behavioral treatment for preschoolers with severe mental retardation and pervasive developmental disorder.

Am J Ment Retard. 1997;102:238-249.

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Research Articles to Support Efficacy of ABA and

To Support Insurance Coverage for ABA Services

 

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2/17/08

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